tiny house rv

The time has come....

TinyHouse43 is 4Sale. $55,000.00, serious inquires only, please e-mail is at tinyhouse43@gmail.com for showings.

We built our tiny house to become financially independent, and we still will be… as soon as we sell it. As much as we utterly ADORE our home, we’ve reached a point where owning it is actually holding us back instead of paving the way forward. So, here she is… ready for her new owners to derive as much pleasure from her as we have!

Everything you need to know about our house is on this blog, and make sure you check the WordPress Building Blog link as well for further details. We’re happy to answer basic questions if you can’t find the answer on the blogs, but please remember this is a VERY emotional decision for us… we’d appreciate avoiding the Spanish Inquisition if possible (after all… no one expects the Spanish Inquisition!). We are still doing some finish touch work on the inside (you can see some of that documented on instagram), but the house is completely liveable and has been since 2015. It’s strictly cosmetics at this point.

We no longer have our dually to tow this to you, so you would be responsible for moving it yourself once the deal is complete and money has changed hands/cleared the bank. The house weighs approximately 12,000lbs with belongings included, so please plan accordingly. It requires a Class V hitch, and we recommend at 3500/350 type full size truck.

Recap: $55,000.00 – you’re saving over $20k from the actual build cost, including the $16,000.00 Tumbleweed Barn Raiser she started as! Many thanks for following us all these years, and we look forward to hearing from you!! PLEASE SHARE THIS POST WITH ANYONE WHO MIGHT BE INTERESTED!!

💜🏡💙 – Meg, Brand, and R.A.D

#tinyhouse #tumbleweed #tumbleweedtinyhouse #tumbleweedbarnraiser #barnraiser #tinyhouseonwheels #thow #tinyhome #microhome #tinyhouserv #tinyhousetogo #diytinyhouse #tinyhousebuild #tinyhousefamily #tinyhousekids #tinyhouseforsale #tinyhouse4sale #tinyhouses4sale #tinyhousesforsale

Our Funky, Colorful Roof

The folks who make our primary roofing material (and the ONLY thing on our tiny house that we never changed during our entire design process) have done a nice little write up on their site about our house and their products. We couldn't be happier with our DaVinci Roofscapes Bellaforte Shake roof! To our knowledge we were the very first tiny house to ever use DaVinci - ours was ordered long before the first Tiny House Nation season was even filmed (we know, because THN contacted us to film that first year) - but I'm glad others have found out first hand how amazing this product really is. It's definitely my favorite part of our exterior and constantly a topic of conversation wherever we go!

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For those wondering, we chose to have each of the four colors we used - light violet, light green, light purple, and dark grey - run in individual batches instead of using the Variblend technique so that each of our 4 colors would really stand out from one another. We felt that was both more true to our design ideas and allowed the colors to really stand out since a tiny house roof by design is significantly smaller than a traditional house. If you want to make your colors pop, that's really the best option just FYI.

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The folks we spoke with back in 2014 were super nice and helpful with our unique requests, and they made ordering simple. We did have to make some on-site alterations to the tiles (specifically the rake tiles) to get them to fit our roofline, and we chose to create a metal ridge piece (the top cap that's solid dark blue on our house) because we couldn't figure out a better way to make the DaVinci ridge pieces look right with our roof. Regardless, they were easy to install with just Brand doing the work by himself, and they turned out great!!

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So, here's the little article they recently wrote, and feel free to ask any questions you might have regarding our specific installation. We're happy to share what we know! 💙🏡💜

 

http://blog.davinciroofscapes.com/blog/davinci-roofscapes-2/davinci-roofscapes-goes-on-the-road

TH43 v1.0 Video Tour

Greetings! I have posted a pair of heavily detailed video tours of our tiny house to our own YouTube channel called TINY HOUSE FOR THREEI've also embedded them at the bottom of this post for sake of ease.

I want to again remind folks that our house is not 100% completed, and therefore you're going to see plenty of projects left to complete. I also intentionally didn't do a thorough clean on the house before filming, because let's face it - how often have you seen a house with kids and pets be immaculate other than on magazine covers and heavily staged TV shows?! Yup, that's what I thought! The only thing that would have made this video more accurate to our real, day-to-day tiny house living would be to have had R.A.D playing with his cars in his room and Brand sitting in the nook studying or playing video games with more dirty dishes on the counter and me sprawled out on the couch reading a magazine. You may wrinkle your nose at some of our unfinished work or the dishes in the sink because it's not aesthetically pleasing, and we've already had some folks give unsolicited snipes about our design choices and layout ("Only thing better would be tiny house with a better design than a hallway... 😬"). Regardless of your own preferences for what you think a tiny house should look like, including your own if you go that route, you need to keep one highly important fact in mind:

 THIS IS OUR TINY HOME, NOT YOURS! 💖

We built OUR house to OUR standards for OUR needs and to OUR budget and timeframe, and we aren't done yet!! We chose to go on and share both photos and a video tour of our work-in-progress house now because 1) it's going to be a while before we really have it ALL done to our satisfaction and 2) because we want to encourage others, especially those who have little to no help for their build who are trudging along fretting about whether or not they'll ever finish it, that IT'S OKAY FOR YOUR HOUSE TO NOT BE PERFECT by the time you are ready to move in! Sure, it's a royal pain in the keester to live in a construction zone, especially a TINY construction zone, but it CAN. BE. DONE.

Your house doesn't have to be HGTV ready to be loved, to be lived in, and to be proud of. The haters and trolls will be there no matter how pristine your floors are, how white your walls are, or how sparkling your expensive hammered copper sink that you simply couldn't resist is, so just keep on keeping on! 😉 Be proud of what you've accomplished so far, what you'll continue to complete in the future, and of the very fact you had the cajones to start in the first place!! I've found some of the most vocal critics of our tiny house and of many others don't even live in a tiny house and have no plans to do so. What suddenly makes them the experts on tiny house building, design, and living?! Oh that's right.... not a damn thing! ☺️ So just remember....

YOU ROCK, AND SO DO WE!! 

Now that I've dismounted the soap box and without any further ado, may I proudly present our unfinished, unkempt TinyHouse43 v1.0 in all its video tour glory! 

💙🏡💜 

P. S. I should also point out this isn't a, " and here's the kitchen, and over there is the bathroom," type tour. I actually share useful information about our house that anyone building or living in a tiny house might find useful. That's why combined the tour is 30 minutes long! 😜

Tiny House (43) Swoon

Even though our house is still a work in progress and we are having to take a break from full-time living for a while (see why Reality Bites), I finally decided it really is TinyHouseSwoon-worthy and sent them some photos. They agreed, and we are the new post for today! Sure, there are vast swaths of unpainted plywood visible and some areas completely missing doors or other coverings, but you know what?? It's still beautiful!

 

Credit to Megan Carthel of the Glendale Cherry Creek Chronicle for the first photo. 

Credit to Megan Carthel of the Glendale Cherry Creek Chronicle for the first photo. 

Our tiny house journey is still a work in progress as well - bumps, detours, and construction delays included - but that doesn't make our efforts thus far any less amazing. It's sooo easy for me to be exceptionally hard on myself when things don't work out the way I envisioned they would, especially when so much planning and hard work has gone into it all. I admit it's sometimes difficult to see all the gorgeous tiny houses on TinyHouseSwoon.com and all around the web and not feel just a bit inadequate as our house is nowhere near the finished quality of those displayed, and I know there's some psychological mumbojumbo that can explain those feelings. Still, we are very proud of what we were able to accomplish with virtually no outside help for the physical labor while building paycheck to paycheck with a full-time work or school schedule and a rambunctious toddler to chase around the whole time. It's not perfect or finished, but what in life ever truly is?!

So, without further ado, I invite you to check out our house on Tiny House Swoon. The photos of our house will be familiar, but once you're done looking at our post, be sure to swoon over some of the other beauties - some of which are also works in progress! - shared by their loving owners, proud builders, and other admirers. 

 💙🏡💜

Our THOW Interior: January 2016

We are most definitely NOT done with the inside of our tiny house - loads of finish work left to do, including painting a zillion different things - but since we had to do a deep clean for a visitor today who needed to take photos, I took advantage of the time to snap some photos. Granted I didn't drag the DSLR out from under the storage sofa for higher quality shots, but as I keep saying, you'll get the gist. Captions will come later, but I think these are pretty self-explanatory. Without further ado, I give you our still-in-progress TinyHouse43 interior! 💙🏡💜

 

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Riverview RV Park and Tiny Houses: A Community Within A Community?

Before I write anything else, let me preface this post by saying that I have no affiliation with the staff or owner of Riverview RV Park, nor do I have any say in what or to whom the owner rents parking spaces to. I'm simply the owner of the very first tiny-house-on-wheels that has had the pleasure of parking here since October 2015 and hopefully not the last.  Riverview has been a perfect place for us to spend our first winter in our tiny house, and because the park owner and staff have been so wonderful to us and are open to having more tiny houses in their park, I wanted to share our experiences with other THOW dwellers, as well as plant the seeds for the possibility of a tiny house community within the existing RV park should the owner be amenable. The decision to pursue or not any of my ideas and suggestions are solely the decision of the owner of Riverview, but I will make myself available to him or to any potential tiny house residents should he choose to consider the possibility of hosting a group of tiny houses, particularly if that involves grouping them together in a community setup. I have already expressed my interest in helping gather support and residents for such a community to him and his staff, and while this was a simple conversation in the office one afternoon, there appeared to be genuine interest at the very least in having more tiny houses here period. We will continue to be positive examples of tiny house residents during our stay here in hopes that we might set the tone for such a community, and either way we encourage you to visit the park and try out one of their cabins or bring your own RV or THOW for a short stay. We don't think you'll be disappointed! -Meg

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Now, with that out of the way, I'm going to post some photos I just took of the eastern edge of the park right along the Big Thompson River where there's a grouping of partial hookup spaces that I feel could be utilized as a semi or permanent tiny house community within the confines of Riverview. There are other areas of the park that the owner, should he choose to pursue such an idea, might prefer over this one, but I picked them because I have yet to see them used since we've been here and they're near a bath/laundry house on the property as a simple starting point. These sites do not presently have sewer connections, but the walk to the on-site dump station is short and the office staff stated that there may be connections added in the near future. They have water and electric hookups present, as well as their own fire rings for outside cooking. They also have an amazing view of the river right behind them!

Some adorable little rental cabins are on the other side of the street from them, so I felt like the aesthetic of grouping the tiny houses with the cabins was also a great fit. The area is somewhat secluded from the rest of the park, which also lends to the community-within-a-community feel. Near that area are also more partial hookup sites, tent camping sites, and the RV storage area at the very back of the property (you'll see it in a photo or two). During the winter you have wide open views around the park, and in the fall when we arrived the trees were still thick with colorful leaves aplenty. Quite a beautiful area if I do say so myself!

The rest of the park has some great amenities, including a second bath/laundry house, a gated off-leash dog park (you're responsible for picking up after your own pets no matter where they do their business FYI), a large central park with playground equipment, and a large covered picnic area that includes a stage and outdoor fireplace. There are trails and ponds around the property we've yet to check out, and you can fish in the Big Thompson River as well. There's a convenience store inside the office, and they have two rentable spaces for large gatherings. There are regular potlucks particularly around the holidays, and so far we've loved all the folks we've met who live here year round. Most if not all of the office and maintenance staff live on-site, so if hiccups do occur someone is available to help.

I could go on and on about how much we've enjoyed our stay here at Riverview and in the town of Loveland, CO, but I know our readers are more interested in seeing photos of the property and my suggested area for a tiny house community within Riverview RV Park and Campground. So, without further ado, here they are! 

 

 

 

Here's a panorama of the partial hookup area as seen from the big central park. That's the bath/laundry house in the foreground, and the spaces I'm thinking of are behind and slightly left of it. 

Here's a panorama of the partial hookup area as seen from the big central park. That's the bath/laundry house in the foreground, and the spaces I'm thinking of are behind and slightly left of it. 

This is the bath/laundry house at the back of the park, but there is another near the office. Where we are presently parked with our THOW puts both bath houses equidistant to us, but this one has private baths and showers vs. the dorm-like setup of the house near the office. There are additional showers on the back side of this building as well.

This is the bath/laundry house at the back of the park, but there is another near the office. Where we are presently parked with our THOW puts both bath houses equidistant to us, but this one has private baths and showers vs. the dorm-like setup of the house near the office. There are additional showers on the back side of this building as well.

This is a view to the southeast of the gated dog park. Here dogs are allowed off-leash, but everywhere else in the park requires them to be leashed. No pets are allowed in the central park playground area at all, and owners are always responsible for cleaning up after their pets. 

This is a view to the southeast of the gated dog park. Here dogs are allowed off-leash, but everywhere else in the park requires them to be leashed. No pets are allowed in the central park playground area at all, and owners are always responsible for cleaning up after their pets. 

These cute little cabins are part of what drew me to that area I think would work for a tiny house community. Their aesthetic would go great with THOWs, and they'd be your view across the street. 

These cute little cabins are part of what drew me to that area I think would work for a tiny house community. Their aesthetic would go great with THOWs, and they'd be your view across the street. 

This is a view of the Big Thompson River behind the parking spaces in question. What a lovely view! 

This is a view of the Big Thompson River behind the parking spaces in question. What a lovely view! 

This is a view looking east of some of the partial hookup spaces directly across from the little park cabins where I think tiny houses on wheels would fit well together. These sites have water and electric, but presently you'd have to haul your gray water (or black if you went that route) a short walk to the dump station. The office staff did tell me that sewer hookups may be added in the near future.

This is a view looking east of some of the partial hookup spaces directly across from the little park cabins where I think tiny houses on wheels would fit well together. These sites have water and electric, but presently you'd have to haul your gray water (or black if you went that route) a short walk to the dump station. The office staff did tell me that sewer hookups may be added in the near future.

This is looking northwest at the end of the row of partial hookup sites along the river. Those trees on the left create a little mini park area that divides these spaces from the full hookup spots closer to the front of the RV park. This division would also help create more of a micro community feel for the THOWs from the rest of the park I believe.

This is looking northwest at the end of the row of partial hookup sites along the river. Those trees on the left create a little mini park area that divides these spaces from the full hookup spots closer to the front of the RV park. This division would also help create more of a micro community feel for the THOWs from the rest of the park I believe.

This is the back of one of the partial hookup spaces where you can see the electrical hookup with the water spigot just below. There's a fire ring at each site, and there are picnic tables for each site currently being stored for the winter. You'd be able to roast marshmallows while watching the river from this spot. 💜 

This is the back of one of the partial hookup spaces where you can see the electrical hookup with the water spigot just below. There's a fire ring at each site, and there are picnic tables for each site currently being stored for the winter. You'd be able to roast marshmallows while watching the river from this spot. 💜 

This is a view from that same spot #157 looking over a couple of neighboring spots and through the tree grove toward the front of the RV park. That's one of the rentable cabins on the left, and in the distance you can see the covered picnic and stage area. 

This is a view from that same spot #157 looking over a couple of neighboring spots and through the tree grove toward the front of the RV park. That's one of the rentable cabins on the left, and in the distance you can see the covered picnic and stage area. 

Here's another view of the neighboring cabins from the back of space #157. To the left and behind of the cabins are additional partial hookup spaces and tent camping sites. 

Here's another view of the neighboring cabins from the back of space #157. To the left and behind of the cabins are additional partial hookup spaces and tent camping sites. 

Behind those trees are the tent camping sites and the RV storage area. The river bends around behind that storage area, and there are trails that meander off to the right of that area as well. 

Behind those trees are the tent camping sites and the RV storage area. The river bends around behind that storage area, and there are trails that meander off to the right of that area as well. 

Here's an easterly view from space #157 that shows more of the river and the neighboring spaces that direction. Beautiful! 

Here's an easterly view from space #157 that shows more of the river and the neighboring spaces that direction. Beautiful! 

If you squint, you can just make out our tiny house dead center in the image sticking out to the left of the playground equipment. This was taken on the walk back and looks across the big central park area.

If you squint, you can just make out our tiny house dead center in the image sticking out to the left of the playground equipment. This was taken on the walk back and looks across the big central park area.

This is the road toward the front of the RV park, and I was passing the grove of trees on my right that act as a divider between the full hookup sites ahead and the partial hookup sites just behind and to the right of me as I walked. Here you can see a view of the mountain that is directly across the street from the turn into Riverview. 

This is the road toward the front of the RV park, and I was passing the grove of trees on my right that act as a divider between the full hookup sites ahead and the partial hookup sites just behind and to the right of me as I walked. Here you can see a view of the mountain that is directly across the street from the turn into Riverview. 

Here's a look to the southwest where you can see the other little mountain flanking the park. 

Here's a look to the southwest where you can see the other little mountain flanking the park. 

These are full hookup sites that border the grove of trees I've mentioned. They're within that same area surrounding the bath/laundry house and could potentially house tiny houses, too. All of those decisions are solely that of the park owner, but since they are in close proximity to the partial hookup sites I wanted to show them as well. 

These are full hookup sites that border the grove of trees I've mentioned. They're within that same area surrounding the bath/laundry house and could potentially house tiny houses, too. All of those decisions are solely that of the park owner, but since they are in close proximity to the partial hookup sites I wanted to show them as well. 

Lastly, this photo was taken from the dump station next to the central park looking back toward the partial hookup sites where I believe a tiny house community within the RV park could be established. So long as those spaces have no sewer hookups you'd make this short walk to dump your waste, but the staff did say there was a possibility of them being converted to full hookup. 

Lastly, this photo was taken from the dump station next to the central park looking back toward the partial hookup sites where I believe a tiny house community within the RV park could be established. So long as those spaces have no sewer hookups you'd make this short walk to dump your waste, but the staff did say there was a possibility of them being converted to full hookup. 

As I talk more with the owner about my ideas, I will share what I find out with his permission. I did tell the staff the day I spoke with them about this possibility that the number one thing the park would need to work on in order to court more THOWs is to have more reliable WiFi service since so many folks who live in tiny houses work from home remotely via Internet. They advised me they were already working on improving the connections here, and in the meantime I've been doing some research of my own.

What I can tell you today with certainty is that no devices that run on the Sprint network will work here, which sadly leaves the otherwise awesome Karma Go concept out. Verizon and AT&T have strong signals all over this area, but unless you have a grandfathered unlimited plan they aren't exactly affordable options for heavy users. I will be buying and testing a T-Mobile device for our use in addition to our Verizon devices to see if that will work as an option for unlimited internet, even if they do throttle speeds after 16GB or thereabouts. According to their coverage map, Riverview is in their lowest signal range BUT there have been user confirmed connections within the park itself. I'll post our findings once I've had a chance to try out T-Mobile, and hopefully the improvements of the park will help bridge any remaining service gaps.

That's it for now! I do know you can bring your THOW for short stays already, so hopefully the idea of creating a more permanent community of them isn't out of the question for the owner. He and his staff are wonderful in our humble opinions, and even with a few hiccups here and there with water pressure and winter weather woes (all of which were quickly attended to by the staff I might add) we've been very pleased with our stay. Our son has loved being by the playground, and there are enough kiddos that cycle through to keep him out playing as often as we let him. The place is a great mix of ages and stages, and we highly recommend it!!

For more information, contact Riverview via their website or call - just know you might get someone different each time, and email replies are much slower than phone calls:

www.RiverviewRV.com or 970-667-9910

They are presently closed on Sundays and Mondays through the winter, and I don't suggest using their online reservation system if you plan to bring your THOW. Call them first so they can accommodate you properly, and let them know Maighen in the tiny house sent you!

Through 2016... AND BEYOND!!

And yes,  you're supposed to read that in Buzz Lightyear's voice. :)
 
So, 2015 has come and gone, and man are we POOPED! The year passed like a whirlwind, and the dust is most definitely still settling around us both on the tiny home front and with my work schedule. Even though our routines are normalizing here in Colorado and we're barely 2 days into the new year, we're still looking forward to our tiny house travel in a year or so. I know, I know. Focus on the now. Admittedly I've always been the type who likes to daydream about the future, and while I know I need to rein it back a bit to deal with current affairs, this post is about the "and beyond," too. I'll save the harsh(ish) realities for the end and share the cooler bits now.

Having now been exposed to three different groups of awesome THOW/RV families from Alaska (Tiny Tall House, Tiny House Growing Family, and  The Play Forest) and hearing about their adventures in their home state, we've been discussing changing our tiny house travel plans to include some interesting seasonal jobs - including a possible stint in AK vs. just visiting by cruise ship - rather than just sticking with travel nursing assignments. Also, it'd be great if the workload could be shared by us both and yet still allow plenty of time for Brand to work on school and us to explore as a family. I'd be a liar if I said I enjoy being the sole source of income all the time, but it's a burden I'm 100% willing to bear to put our whole family on the path toward what I think is the best goal anyone can ever set: to create a life you don't need a vacation from!

Now don't get me wrong - I love my career - but I'd much rather do something fun while we explore this great continent of ours. There'll be plenty more time for me to work in the clinical setting, and Brand has a long career ahead in a similar setting once he finishes school, too. Why not take advantage of the unique opportunities full-time THOW/RV traveling has to offer while we have the chance? After all, part of what has made our tiny house adventure possible is this brief window of time between both Brand and R.A.D being in school full-time. If ever there was an appropriate time for us to carpe this diem, that time is NOW!

So, here are a few seasonal and travel-friendly ideas I have for us:

Remote tele-transcription while on the East Coast visiting family? Done!
Sugar beet harvesting in Montana in the fall? Why not?!
Greenhorning on an Alaskan salmon boat in the spring or berry picking in the late summer? Heck yes!

The timing for adventures like those would have to align with our primary travel plans, but I can't deny the cool factor of telling people, "We fished on a salmon boat in Alaska," sure does have a lot of sway! Still, as fun as it is to plan for the future, no matter how close that future may really be, we do still have to focus on the here and now. Boring! But necessary, alas.

Of the many reasons we chose to spend a year or so in Colorado before hitting the road - still just a long day's drive from our Texas family; me being able to stay with my same employer; because Colorado, duh! - having the chance to pay off at least the vast majority of our debt (not counting the truck) while in a stable parking location and with stable employment was the numero uno "Pro" on our list. Unfortunately, the higher cost of living in the area, along with some unforeseen and expensive variables, has required me to take up a 2nd job again if we want to make any real headway toward becoming debt-free. It's not what I wanted for myself - I'd much rather be home with my boys or out exploring the beauty of this state - but the ends most definitely justify the means. I'm fortunate to have a career that allows me to work 12-hr days, which means I have 4 days off per week anyway. I'm more than willing to sacrifice an extra one to get the ball rolling on what is the most important piece of our traveling lifestyle puzzle!

We've been through the broke-cycle before, but this time is different because our priorities are different. Before we just wanted to pay cards down so we could buy more stuff. Now we want to pay cards OFF so we can close the accounts completely and really start building up savings. I know, I know. Closing cards will adversely affect our credit ratings, but we obtained most of those cards when we were young and broke (read: sky high interest rates and big annual fees). Unless we can talk the companies out of charging us annually for cards we won't use, we'd rather just keep the best few cards and take the debt-to-income ratio hit that sucks your credit score into the crapper. Yes, that may hurt us a bit when we do go to buy land in Washington - and who knows, maybe we'll suck it up and wait until after we do that - but I'd rather eliminate the temptation all together.

Anyway, no matter how we get from A to B, the end game is still the same: end 2016 without any (or at least very, VERY little) credit card debt remaining, save a yet-to-be-determined amount in our savings account plus an extra buffer amount strictly for travel expenses, and prepare to head out on our travels in early 2017. We've also got to squeeze in the time and squeeze out the funds to finish the remaining work on the tiny house itself. Can't forget that! If we've achieved our financial goals by the departure date, I see no reason we can't travel a bit more leisurely and take more adventurous jobs along the way to continue funding the journey.

We'd of course love it if we had enough saved to not HAVE to work along the way, but I'm a realist and know we'd need more than a year to achieve that unless I worked even more than I plan to now. I consider our time in Colorado to be a working vacation, and I'm not willing to completely sacrifice the vacation portion of the equation! Instead we have to get on the "Budget Train," something we've only used abstractly in the past, so we can buckle down our finances, prioritize the remaining house projects, and maximize my days off to explore our beautiful temporary home state.

I also want to share a link from Technomadia, who have a great post about working while traveling. That's actually where I found the sugar beet harvesting idea, along with a bunch of other really cool options for alternative income means. I've got another link I'll have to add later that gives even more non-office-based job ideas, which is where I found the info on doing mobile transcription. That one, incidentally, potentially pays pretty well. Definitely worth looking at if you've got the skills to listen to audio tapes and accurately type out what you hear. Maybe my medical background will give me an in to the higher paying medical transcription options. Hmm... :)

That's it from us for now. We hope your holidays were merry and bright, and we wish you all the best for a prosperous, adventurous, and productive 2016... AND BEYOND! 

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